Social constructions of deafness : examining deaf languacultures in education
(Book)

Book Cover
Average Rating
Published:
Washington, DC : Gallaudet University Press, 2012.
Format:
Book
Physical Desc:
xii, 295 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
Status:
LSDHH - Adult Non-Fiction
H.I. Coll. 371.912 H8116s
Description

Thomas P. Horejes's new book focuses on revealing critical knowledge that addresses certain social justice issues, including deafness, language, culture, and deaf education. He conveys this information through discourses about his own experiences being deaf and through his research in which he "stresses the contingency of the social" in educational institutions. In Social Constructions of Deafness: Examining Deaf Languacultures in Education , Horejes contends that schools as social institutions play powerful and exacting roles in the creation and maintenance of social constructions such as language and culture for deaf children. He subscribes to Michael Agar's concept of "languaculture," defined as the inextricable relationship between language and culture in which a specific language will shape and influence culture. His approach employs other anthropological terminology as he connects his personal experience as a deaf student (emic) to academic research on deafness (etic) to bring understanding to the multidimensional aspects of his own negotiated identities. Horejes extends his inquiry through his analysis of two kindergarten classes for deaf students, one orally oriented and the other conducted using sing language. His findings are sobering evidence of the myriad challenges educators face in defining appropriate academic, linguistic, and cultural pedagogy for deaf children in schools and other social institutions.

Also in This Series
Copies
Location
Call Number
Status
LSDHH - Adult Non-Fiction
H.I. Coll. 371.912 H8116s
On Shelf
More Like This
More Details
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781563685415, 1563685418

Notes

Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (pages 249-281) and index.
Description
"Thomas P. Horejes's new book focuses on revealing critical knowledge that addresses certain social justice issues, including deafness, language, culture, and deaf education. He conveys this information through discourses about his own experiences being deaf and through his research in which he "stresses the contingency of the social" in educational institutions. In Social Constructions of Deafness: Examining Deaf Languacultures in Education, Horejes contends that schools as social institutions play powerful and exacting roles in the creation and maintenance of social constructions such as language and culture for deaf children. He subscribes to Michael Agar's concept of "lauguaculture," defined as the inextricable relationship between language and culture in which a specific language will shape and influence culture. His approach employs other anthropological terminology as he connects his personal experience as a deaf student (emic) to academic research on deafness (etic) to bring understanding to the multidimensional aspects of his own negotiated identities. Horejes extends his inquiry through his analysis of two kindergarten classes for deaf students, one orally oriented and the other conducted using sing language. His findings are sobering evidence of the myriad challenges educators face in defining appropriate academic, linguistic, and cultural pedagogy for deaf children in schools and other social institutions."--books.google.
Reviews from GoodReads
Loading GoodReads Reviews.
Citations
APA Citation (style guide)

Horejes, T. P. (2012). Social constructions of deafness: examining deaf languacultures in education. Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press.

Chicago / Turabian - Author Date Citation (style guide)

Horejes, Thomas P. 2012. Social Constructions of Deafness: Examining Deaf Languacultures in Education. Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press.

Chicago / Turabian - Humanities Citation (style guide)

Horejes, Thomas P, Social Constructions of Deafness: Examining Deaf Languacultures in Education. Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press, 2012.

MLA Citation (style guide)

Horejes, Thomas P. Social Constructions of Deafness: Examining Deaf Languacultures in Education. Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press, 2012. Print.

Note! Citation formats are based on standards as of July 2010. Citations contain only title, author, edition, publisher, and year published. Citations should be used as a guideline and should be double checked for accuracy.
Staff View
Grouped Work ID:
ae7a36a8-0b15-7fcf-7576-3b8bae941342
Go To GroupedWorkView in Staff Client
Last File Modification TimeDec 19, 2017 12:01:49 AM
Last Grouped Work Modification TimeDec 19, 2017 12:01:49 AM

MARC Record

LEADER02845cam a2200397 i 4500
001ocn795164298
003OCoLC
00520130523075307.0
008121109s2012    dcua     b    001 0 eng  
010 |a 2012042855
020 |a 9781563685415
020 |a 1563685418
042 |a pcc
049 |a TNNA
092 |a 371.912|b H8116s
1001 |a Horejes, Thomas P.
24510|a Social constructions of deafness :|b examining deaf languacultures in education /|c Thomas P. Horejes.
264 1|a Washington, DC :|b Gallaudet University Press,|c 2012.
300 |a xii, 295 pages :|b illustrations ;|c 25 cm.
336 |a text|2 rdacontent.
337 |a unmediated|2 rdamedia.
338 |a volume|2 rdacarrier.
504 |a Includes bibliographical references (pages 249-281) and index.
520 |a "Thomas P. Horejes's new book focuses on revealing critical knowledge that addresses certain social justice issues, including deafness, language, culture, and deaf education. He conveys this information through discourses about his own experiences being deaf and through his research in which he "stresses the contingency of the social" in educational institutions. In Social Constructions of Deafness: Examining Deaf Languacultures in Education, Horejes contends that schools as social institutions play powerful and exacting roles in the creation and maintenance of social constructions such as language and culture for deaf children. He subscribes to Michael Agar's concept of "lauguaculture," defined as the inextricable relationship between language and culture in which a specific language will shape and influence culture. His approach employs other anthropological terminology as he connects his personal experience as a deaf student (emic) to academic research on deafness (etic) to bring understanding to the multidimensional aspects of his own negotiated identities. Horejes extends his inquiry through his analysis of two kindergarten classes for deaf students, one orally oriented and the other conducted using sing language. His findings are sobering evidence of the myriad challenges educators face in defining appropriate academic, linguistic, and cultural pedagogy for deaf children in schools and other social institutions."--books.google.
650 0|a Deaf|x Education.
650 0|a Deaf|x Social conditions.
650 0|a Deaf culture.
650 0|a Language and culture.
650 0|a Language and languages|x Study and teaching.
898 |a qBook
898 |a qEnglish
907 |a .b21947302|b 05-24-13|c 05-23-13
910 |a CARL0000415664
949 |b 35192044172090|c H.I. Coll. 371.912 H8116s|h HI|j HI|l ANF|m BK|s S|p 70.00|w 2|x 20130523|t 20170702|q CNV|r RLW|v 0|y 20170714|z 1
991 |a hi|b 05-23-13|c m|d a|e 6|f eng|g dcu|h 0|i 1
998 4|a LDR0905 20170611042705 NPUB |b LDR0905 20170611042705 NPUB