Mrs. Sigourney of Hartford : poems and prose on the early American deaf community
(Book)

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Published:
Washington, D.C. : Gallaudet University Press, [2013].
Format:
Book
Physical Desc:
x, 161 pages ; 23 cm.
Status:
LSDHH - Adult Non-Fiction
H.I. Coll. 811.3 M9397s
Description

Lydia Huntley was born in 1791 in Norwich, CT, the only child of a poor Revolutionary war veteran. But her father's employer, a wealthy widow, gave young Lydia the run of her library and later sent her for visits to Hartford, CT. After teaching at her own school for several years in Norwich, Lydia returned to Hartford to head a class of 15 girls from the best families. Among her students was Alice Cogswell, a deaf girl soon to be famous as a student of Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet and Laurent Clerc.        Lydia's inspiration came from a deep commitment to the education of girls and also for African American, Indian, and deaf children. She left teaching to marry Charles Sigourney, then turned to writing to support her family, publishing 56 books, 2,000 magazine articles, and popular poetry. Lydia Sigourney never abandoned her passion for deaf education, remaining a supporter of Gallaudet's school for the deaf until her death. Yet, her contributions to deaf education and her writing have been forgotten until now.        All of Lydia Sigourney's of Lydia Sigourney's work on the nascent Deaf community is presented in this new volume. Her writing intertwines her mastery of the sentimentalism form popular in her day with her sharp insights on the best ways to educate deaf children. In the process, Mrs. Sigourney of Hartford reestablishes her rightful place in history.

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Status
LSDHH - Adult Non-Fiction
H.I. Coll. 811.3 M9397s
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Language:
English
ISBN:
9781563685576 (trade pbk.), 1563685574 (trade pbk.)
UPC:
40022472804

Notes

Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (pages 153-159) and index.
Description
"Lydia Huntley was born in 1791 in Norwich, CT, the only child of a poor Revolutionary war veteran. But her father's employer, a wealthy widow, gave young Lydia the run of her library and later sent her for visits to Hartford, CT. After teaching at her own school for several years in Norwich, Lydia returned to Hartford to head a class of 15 girls from the best families. Among her students was Alice Cogswell, a deaf girl soon to be famous as a student of Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet and Laurent Clerc. Lydia's inspiration came from a deep commitment to the education of girls and also for African American, Indian, and deaf children. She left teaching to marry Charles Sigourney, then turned to writing to support her family, publishing 56 books, 2,000 magazine articles, and popular poetry. Lydia Sigourney never abandoned her passion for deaf education, remaining a supporter of Gallaudet's school for the deaf until her death. Yet, her contributions to deaf education and her writing have been forgotten until now. The best of Lydia Sigourney's work on the nascent Deaf community is presented in this new volume. Her writing intertwines her mastery of the sentimentalism form popular in her day with her sharp insights on the best ways to educate deaf children. In the process, Mrs. Sigourney of Hartford reestablishes her rightful place in history"--,Provided by publisher.
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Citations
APA Citation (style guide)

Sayers, E. E., & Moore, D. (2013). Mrs. Sigourney of Hartford: poems and prose on the early American deaf community. Washington, D.C.: Gallaudet University Press.

Chicago / Turabian - Author Date Citation (style guide)

Sayers, Edna Edith and Diana Moore. 2013. Mrs. Sigourney of Hartford: Poems and Prose On the Early American Deaf Community. Washington, D.C.: Gallaudet University Press.

Chicago / Turabian - Humanities Citation (style guide)

Sayers, Edna Edith and Diana Moore, Mrs. Sigourney of Hartford: Poems and Prose On the Early American Deaf Community. Washington, D.C.: Gallaudet University Press, 2013.

MLA Citation (style guide)

Sayers, Edna Edith,, and Diana Moore. Mrs. Sigourney of Hartford: Poems and Prose On the Early American Deaf Community. Washington, D.C.: Gallaudet University Press, 2013. Print.

Note! Citation formats are based on standards as of July 2010. Citations contain only title, author, edition, publisher, and year published. Citations should be used as a guideline and should be double checked for accuracy.
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Grouped Work ID:
459ab467-7424-5539-3998-50db56db6da9
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Last File Modification TimeDec 19, 2017 12:02:33 AM
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MARC Record

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24500|a Mrs. Sigourney of Hartford :|b poems and prose on the early American deaf community /|c Edna Edith Sayers and Diana Moore, editors.
264 1|a Washington, D.C. :|b Gallaudet University Press,|c [2013]
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504 |a Includes bibliographical references (pages 153-159) and index.
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7001 |a Moore, Diana,|d 1952-|e editor.
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