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Deaf students and the qualitative similarity hypothesis : understanding language and literacy development
(Book)

Book Cover
Average Rating
Contributors:
Wang, Ye, author.
Williams, Cheri, author.
Published:
Washington, DC : Gallaudet University Press, 2013.
Format:
Book
Physical Desc:
xi, 266 pages ; 26 cm.
Status:
LSDHH - Adult Non-Fiction
H.I. Coll. 371.912 P3247d
Description

The difficulty that deaf and hard of hearing students have in attaining language and literacy skills has led to postulations that attribute their struggle to a developmental deficit. Recent research reveals, however, that deaf students acquire language structures, produce errors, and employ strategies in the same fashion as younger hearing students, though at later ages. The ability of all students to learn language and literacy skills in a similar manner at different stages forms the foundation of the Qualitative Similarity Hypothesis (QSH). This volume describes the theoretical underpinnings and research findings of the QSH. It presents the educational implications for deaf and hard of hearing children and offers reason-based practices for improving their English language and literacy development. This collection also stresses the critical importance of exposing educators to the larger fields of literacy and second-language learning. Providing this background information expands the possibility of differentiating instruction to meet the needs of deaf students. Deaf Students and the Qualitative Similarity Hypothesis includes commentary on the QSH for both first- and second-language English learners and reflects on how the QSH can effect a better future for all language students.

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Status
LSDHH - Adult Non-Fiction
H.I. Coll. 371.912 P3247d
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More Details
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781563685842, 1563685841

Notes

Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Description
"The difficulty that deaf and hard of hearing students have in attaining language and literacy skills has led to postulations that attribute their struggle to a developmental deficit. Recent research reveals, however, that deaf students acquire language structures, produce errors, and employ strategies in the same fashion as younger hearing students, though at later ages. The ability of all students to learn language and literacy skills in a similar manner at different stages forms the foundation of the Qualitative Similarity Hypothesis (QSH). This volume describes the theoretical underpinnings and research findings of the QSH. It presents the educational implications for deaf and hard of hearing children and offers reason-based practices for improving their English language and literacy development. This collection also stresses the critical importance of exposing educators to the larger fields of literacy and second-language learning. Providing this background information expands the possibility of differentiating instruction to meet the needs of deaf students. Deaf Students and the Qualitative Similarity Hypothesis includes commentary on the QSH for both first- and second-language English learners and reflects on how the QSH can effect a better future for all language students. "--,Provided by publisher.
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Citations
APA Citation (style guide)

Paul, P. V., Wang, Y., & Williams, C. (2013). Deaf students and the qualitative similarity hypothesis: understanding language and literacy development. Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press.

Chicago / Turabian - Author Date Citation (style guide)

Paul, Peter V, Ye, Wang and Cheri, Williams. 2013. Deaf Students and the Qualitative Similarity Hypothesis: Understanding Language and Literacy Development. Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press.

Chicago / Turabian - Humanities Citation (style guide)

Paul, Peter V, Ye, Wang and Cheri, Williams, Deaf Students and the Qualitative Similarity Hypothesis: Understanding Language and Literacy Development. Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press, 2013.

MLA Citation (style guide)

Paul, Peter V,, Ye Wang, and Cheri Williams. Deaf Students and the Qualitative Similarity Hypothesis: Understanding Language and Literacy Development. Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press, 2013. Print.

Note! Citation formats are based on standards as of July 2010. Citations contain only title, author, edition, publisher, and year published. Citations should be used as a guideline and should be double checked for accuracy.
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Grouped Work ID:
58c223e7-3a99-9d79-552e-43a94f68b29b
Go To GroupedWorkView in Staff Client
Last File Modification TimeFeb 21, 2020 11:31:47 PM
Last Grouped Work Modification TimeFeb 21, 2020 11:19:46 PM

MARC Record

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