Hidden figures : the American dream and the untold story of the Black women mathematicians who helped win the space race
(Book)

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Published
New York, NY : William Morrow, [2016].
Status
Bellevue - Adult Non-Fiction  19 available
510.9252 L4813h
Bordeaux - Adult Non-Fiction  12 available
510.9252 L4813h
Donelson - Adult Non-Fiction  1 available
510.9252 L4813h

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LocationCall NumberStatus
Bellevue - Adult Non-Fiction510.9252 L4813hOn Shelf
Bellevue - Adult Non-Fiction510.9252 L4813hOn Shelf
Bellevue - Adult Non-Fiction510.9252 L4813hOn Shelf
Bellevue - Adult Non-Fiction510.9252 L4813hOn Shelf
Bellevue - Adult Non-Fiction510.9252 L4813hOn Shelf
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More Details

Format
Book
Edition
First edition.
Physical Desc
xviii, 346 pages ; 24 cm.
Language
English
ISBN
9780062363602, 0062363603, 9780062363596, 006236359X
Reading Level
UG
Level 9.7, 18 Points

Notes

Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (pages 273-328) and index.
Description
Before John Glenn orbited the earth or Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of dedicated female mathematicians known as "human computers" used pencils, slide rules and adding machines to calculate the numbers that would launch rockets, and astronauts, into space. Among these problem-solvers were a group of exceptionally talented African American women, some of the brightest minds of their generation. Originally relegated to teaching math in the South's segregated public schools, they were called into service during the labor shortages of World War II, when America's aeronautics industry was in dire need of anyone who had the right stuff. Suddenly, these overlooked math whizzes had a shot at jobs worthy of their skills, and they answered Uncle Sam's call, moving to Hampton Virginia and the fascinating, high-energy world of the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory. Even as Virginia's Jim Crow laws required them to be segregated from their white counterparts, the women of Langley's all-black "West Computing" group helped America achieve one of the things it desired most: a decisive victory over the Soviet Union in the Cold War, and complete domination of the heavens."--,adapted from publisher website.

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Citations

APA Citation, 7th Edition (style guide)

Shetterly, M. L. (2016). Hidden figures: the American dream and the untold story of the Black women mathematicians who helped win the space race (First edition.). William Morrow.

Chicago / Turabian - Author Date Citation, 17th Edition (style guide)

Shetterly, Margot Lee. 2016. Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race. New York, NY: William Morrow.

Chicago / Turabian - Humanities (Notes and Bibliography) Citation, 17th Edition (style guide)

Shetterly, Margot Lee. Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race New York, NY: William Morrow, 2016.

MLA Citation, 9th Edition (style guide)

Shetterly, Margot Lee. Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race First edition., William Morrow, 2016.

Note! Citations contain only title, author, edition, publisher, and year published. Citations should be used as a guideline and should be double checked for accuracy. Citation formats are based on standards as of August 2021.

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